News & Articles

Tuesday, December 27, 2016 - 8:27am

SPRINGFIELD, Ill. • Illinois is almost six months behind in its obligation to give millions of dollars to school districts across the state for transportation, special education and other expenses.

The Herald & Review reports the stopgap spending deal Republican Gov. Bruce Rauner and the Democratic-controlled Legislature struck over the summer authorized a full year's funding for elementary and secondary education, intending to spare public schools from the uncertainty plaguing other state operations, which were only funded for six months.

Friday, December 23, 2016 - 8:41am

KANSAS CITY • A federal appeals court on Thursday reinstated a judge’s 2013 ruling that a central Missouri technical college’s mandatory drug testing policy is unconstitutional when applied to all students.

The full 8th U.S. District Court of Appeals, in a 9-2 ruling, sided with the American Civil Liberties Union in reversing an earlier decision by a three-judge panel of the same St. Louis-based court.

Thursday, December 22, 2016 - 8:15am

Updated at 4:43 p.m. on Dec. 22 to include ACLU's follow-up motion

School board elections in the Ferguson-Florissant School District will continue unchanged, at least until an appeal to a court ruling is heard.

Wednesday, December 21, 2016 - 9:09am

St. Louis Public Schools will close Langston Middle and Cote Brilliante Elementary at the end of this school year because of low enrollment.

The district’s Special Administrative Board finalized the decision, which Superintendent Kelvin Adams had recommended in November, at a special meeting Tuesday night.

“Consolidation is a natural process to free up additional dollars to support all of our schools,” Adams said. “When you have small enrollment numbers, it impacts how we can spread dollars to other schools that have larger enrollment.”

Tuesday, December 20, 2016 - 8:33am

ST. LOUIS • Celebrated civil rights leader Frankie Muse Freeman received a honorary degree Saturday from the University of Missouri-Columbia.

Freeman was the first African American woman to practice law in Missouri and a lead attorney in the 1954 NAACP lawsuit against the St. Louis Housing Authority.

President Lyndon Johnson later appointed her to the United States Commission on Civil Rights.

The honor is one of many that Freeman, 100, earned during the last few years, including a star on St. Louis' Walk of Fame in 2015.

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