St. Louis swings for good average on 'college-town' list

While one doesn't usually describe bigger cities such as St. Louis as "college towns," one list thinks the moniker fits just fine.

Our fair burg was <a href="http://nie.post-dispatch.com/%3Ca%20href%3D"https://wallethub.com/edu/best-worst-college-cities-and-towns-in-america/8974/"">https://wallethub.com/edu/best-worst-college-cities-and-towns-in-america... target="_blank">ranked No. 10 out of the 64</a> U.S. cities with a population of at least 300,000 by personal finance website WalletHub.

Even better, none of our major-city neighbors graded out better than us: Nashville (15); Chicago (23); Kansas City (24); Indianapolis (38); Louisville (39); and Memphis (61).

When it came to mid-size cities (pop: 125,000 to 300,000), Springfield, Mo., finished No. 63 in a field of 151 cities.

Out of 200 small cities (pop: less than 125,000), Champaign, Ill., was No. 30; Columbia, Mo., was No. 91; St. Charles was No. 98; and Carbondale, Ill., was No. 101.

St. Louis also fared well in the all-cities list, clocking in at No. 22. out of a total of 415 cities.

Our strongest showing in the overall 415-city field was a No. 29 rank in "social environment," which looked at factors such as share of single people; nightlife options; cafes, breweries and food trucks; shopping centers; sports clubs; and transportation/accessibility.

Our lowest finish was a No. 216 in "wallet friendliness," which took into account tuition; student-loan debt; housing costs; and cost of living.

And in the rather self-explanatory category of "academic and economic opportunities," St. Louis finished at No. 129.

Tags: News
Original content courtesy of stltoday.com and available at St. Louis swings for good average on 'college-town' list.